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The element vanadium displays a deep purple hue.
OSU Press Releases

Research led by chemistry professor makes key advance for carbon capture

A chemical element so visually striking it was named for a goddess shows a “Goldilocks” level of reactivity – neither too much nor too little – that makes it a strong candidate as a carbon scrubbing tool.

Wei Kong and graduate students work in the lab on a huge machine with wires.
Chemistry

Revolutionary imaging research reshaping drug development and disease understanding

One project keeps chemist Wei Kong awake at night, and it started as an idea nearly two decades ago. Now, after being awarded nearly $2 million for four years by the National Institutes of Health, the goal is to create a groundbreaking new tool with the potential to revolutionize drug development and enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms.

Picture of Professor Mas Subramanian with a Molecular Model of YInMn Blue
News

At the end of the rainbow: The neverending frontier of color

In 2023, there were an estimated 1.5 million animal species on Earth– only one is truly blue.

The Obrina Olivewing butterfly is the only observed animal that internally produces a blue pigment; the scales of other blue butterflies are complex structures that only refract blue light.

But blue’s rarity is not limited to the organic world.

An early-morning view of the Agricultural Life Sciences building at OSU, which houses the Mass Spectrometry Center.
News

How HP is printing cells to help researchers learn more about age-related diseases

An HP device that dispenses single cells is empowering precision research at Oregon State University.

University Days graphic
Events

Chemistry brings home University Days awards

The Department of Chemistry brought home four awards during the University Day celebration held on September 19, 2023. We’re so proud of our award winners!! Check out the specific awards.

Picture of Purple Flowers in front of Weatherford Hall
Events

Chemistry Faculty and Staff recognized for another year of great service

The Chemistry Department’s Fall Gathering is a time when we gather as colleagues to recognize and award the hard work and dedication of our faculty and staff over the last academic year.

A brick building with the word "chemistry" stands behind a green tree.
Chemistry

Three Department of Chemistry faculty awarded endowed positions

Congratulations to three Department of Chemistry faculty members awarded endowed positions, recognizing their exceptional contributions to solving major challenges in material science currently facing humankind. May Nyman is the Terrence Bradshaw Chemistry Professor; David Ji is the Bert and Emelyn Christensen Professor; and Chong Fang is the Patricia Valian Reser Endowed Faculty Scholar.

University Day 2023
News

Science receives record-breaking 12 awards at University Day

College of Science faculty, staff, and graduate students have earned a record-breaking number of honors at University Day, a celebratory launch to the academic year featuring an annual awards ceremony. Science winners amassed an impressive 12 awards, beating the previous record of seven and garnering the most of any college across Oregon State.

Picture of storytelling_animated_zinc-battery
News

Breaking through with a better battery for storing renewable energy.

Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a solution for a better battery — one that’s efficient, safe, sustainable and economical for both utilities and consumers.

A woman with short dark hair poses for a headshot wearing a black shirt and red suit jacket.
Faculty and Staff

Oregon State names new College of Science dean

Eleanor Feingold, a statistical geneticist and associate dean with nearly 20 years of leadership experience at the University of Pittsburgh, has been named dean of Oregon State University’s College of Science. She will start Oct. 31.

A visual representation of a nanomaterial.
OSU Press Releases

College of Science researchers find a better way to capture carbon from industrial emissions

Researchers in the College of Science have demonstrated the potential of an inexpensive nanomaterial to scrub carbon dioxide from industrial emissions. The findings, published in Cell Reports Physical Science, are important because improved carbon capture methods are key to addressing climate change, said Oregon State's Kyriakos Stylianou, who led the study.